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20110719
20110719
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the social security benefits drop 22%. that's a big hit for folks that are living on social security. so what can we do today, 25 years in advance, what small thing can we do today to social security which will build up the solvency and life of social security for even more years? that's a -- i think that's an honest challenge and we should view it as an honest challenge. not to eliminate social security but to say to the generation of younger workers in america, it's going to be there and you'll be darn lucky that it is there because a lot of seniors today can tell you the story of their lives paying into social security. they now receive the benefits. but what happened to their other plans for retirement? well, that little 401(k), that ira, that s.e.p. plan took a hit a few years ago, lost about 30% of its value. and for many americans with pension plans where their work, some of those companies went out of business and walked away from those pension obligations. social security has been there. we want it to be there in the future. so we can find ways to strengthen social security and give
if a big bank goes under. second, it said to wall street firms, you can't take the same kind of reckless risks that led to the crisis. and third, it put in place the stronger -- the strongest consumer protections in history. now, to make sure that these protections worked - so ordinary people were dealt with fairly, so they could make informed decisions about their finances - we didn't just change the law. we changed the way the government did business. for years, the job of protecting consumers was divided up in a lot of different agencies. so if you had a problem with a mortgage lender, you called one place. if you had a problem with a credit card company, you called somebody else. it meant there were a lot of people who were responsible, but that meant nobody was responsible. and we changed that. we cut the bureaucracy and put one consumer watchdog in charge, with just one job -- looking out for regular people in the financial system. now, this is an idea that i got from elizabeth warren, who i first met years ago. back then -- this is long before the financial crisis -- elizabeth wa
crews at the scene sarah, steve back to you. >>> thanks our big story, testimony in front of parliament on britain's phone hacking scandal in less than a half hour top london police official will testify. >>> head of news corp. rupert murdoch is to appear wisdom. >>> british prime minister ordered a special particle meantry session. >> yesterday, scotland yard's number two was forced to design this less than 20 hours after the commissioner himself stepped down. both claim their integrity is intact but staying on would be a distraction amidst intense media coverage of the role police media mail have played here and for hiring a news of the world editor now under arrest at a pr consultant. rebecca brooks who resigned as head of rupert murdoch's newspaper on sunday after she voluntarily went in for questioning. >> the position of rebecca brooks can be simply stated she is not guilty of any criminal offence. the position of the metropolitan police is less easy to understand. >>> government remains politically tainted as well the prime minister david cameron on official business in africa ag
, it made taxpayer-funded bailouts illegal, so taxpayers don't have to foot the bill if a big bank goes under. second, it said to wall street firms, you can't take the same kind of reckless risks that led to the crisis. and third, it put in place the stronger -- the strongest consumer protections in history. now, to make sure that these protections worked - so ordinary people were dealt with fairly, so they could make informed decisions about their finances - we didn't just change the law. we changed the way the government did business. for years, the job of protecting consumers was divided up in a lot of different agencies. so if you had a problem with a mortgage lender, you called one place. if you had a problem with a credit card company, you called somebody else. it meant there were a lot of people who were responsible, but that meant nobody was responsible. and we changed that. we cut the bureaucracy and put one consumer watchdog in charge, with just one job -- looking out for regular people in the financial system. now, this is an idea that i got from elizabeth warren, who i firs
for big oil and wall street executives. this bill's actually more extreme than the republican budget passed in april calling for deeper cuts and more hardships for the middle class and older americans. in fact, this bill does nothing to create jobs, nor invest in the roads, bridges, clean energy technology and job training that would really get our economy moving. in short, h.r. 2560 will stifle growth, hurt middle class families and undercut america's seniors. in my district there are over 93,000 social security beneficiaries and over 85,000 medicare enrollees. on behalf of my constituents and for future generations i stand in strong opposition to this bill and the rule. i know that there are those on the other side of the aisle who want to support a reasonable plan to reduce the deficit. this is not the plan. i urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to reject this dangerous proposal and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: mr. speaker, at this time i'm please
this? >> the big box office will be rupert murdoch, one of the world's most powerful media moguls, sitting in front of members of parliament in the british house of commons, being cross-examined essentially about what he knew at news international, news corp, about this phone hacking scandal, we are expecting to hear much less from rebekah brooks, former ceo of news international. editor of "news of the world" as with she's already been arrested so there is a police investigation into her conduct and her -- what she's been up to. and so she's going to be much more con stained as to what she'll be able to see legally to the mps, who will be asking questions. also constraints on what the mps can ask rebekah brooks. they don't want to jeopardize the ongoing criminal investigation into what brooks may or may not have done. an interesting day to watch tomorrow. >> matthew chance in london tonight, thank you very much. >>> now more on in-depth coverage. together with sean hoare, paul mcmullan was one of the first to go on record alleging illegal activity. he was a features executive. wh
republicans that signed it, and that's a pretty big number around here, and that's a pretty bipartisan effort around here. and then i began to despair because i didn't feel like we were making progress toward the goal that we all said -- not all of us but many of us said we wanted to get to, and then today we had this conversation with the gang of six who i think presented a plan, as the senator from texas said, that's not perfect and everybody is going to have a disagreement about this piece or that piece but does meet the three-part test by and large that i have come out to the floor and said time and time again i think we ought to meet for the people of colorado, which is who i represent. and what i also know is this, mr. president. at this remarkable time in the country's history, if we act in a way that leads to a downgrade of this country's credit rating, if we the 100 people that are in the united states senate at this moment don't step up to make sure that that doesn't happen, no one is ever going to care what pledge was made about this or that or where we drew the line in the sand. t
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)